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athena
Style_council
athena
posts: 18

Ugh, am I the only person that hates this trend??
Here is what Michelle Malkin of Fox News says, which I agree with to some extent: “The keffiyeh, for the clueless, is the traditional scarf of Arab men that has come to symbolize murderous Palestinian jihad. Popularized by Yasser Arafat and a regular adornment of Muslim terrorists appearing in beheading and hostage-taking videos, the apparel has been mainstreamed by both ignorant and not-so-ignorant fashion designers, celebrities, and left-wing icons.”
While I don’t think in black-and-white-terms such as keffiyeh = terrorist, I see keffiyeh scarves the same way I see people wearing Che shirts… The keffiyeh scarf, like a picture of Che, brings along with it political implications and traditions that are usually unknown to the average US keffiyeh-wearer who just likes them for the cool “ethnic-y” pattern. So yeah, thoughts??
edit: here is more “keffiyeh dramz” that I pulled off of wiki: The keffiyeh has become a symbol of the Palestinians in the long running Israeli-Palestinian conflict. As a result of its symbolic meaning in this context, its display in the West has periodically been the subject of criticism. In 2007, the American clothing store chain, Urban Outfitters, stopped selling keffiyehs after “a pro-Israel activist … complained about the items” and issued a statement that “the company had not intended ‘to imply any sympathy for or support of terrorists or terrorism’ in selling the keffiyehs and was pulling them.” Rhoda Koenig, a theatre critic for the The Independent in 2006, asserted that the keffiyeh had “become a symbol of Islamic militancy”. A spokesman for Spain’s Popular Party accused Prime Minister Zapatero of “anti-Semitism, anti-Zionism and Israelophobia,” after he “criticized Israel’s attacks on Lebanon and posed in a Palestinian-style keffiyeh scarf.”

posted about 6 years ago
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7564
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7564
posts: 12

i wear them, its a part of my culture, i have one that’s from my personal collection, one that was my father’s, and yes an un-authentic one from UO.
i think its important that people are aware of what they are wearing.
i cant say im thrilled with other people wearing it because like abdulette, i feel as though the trendys have stolen a piece of my culture.
The dapper kid actually wrote a very informative post on the history/origin of the scarf.
http://dapperkid.blogspot.com/2008/07/historica…
that i think is worth reading.
I think its ignorant to associate a piece of fabric with terrorism when so many different regions wear them. I also think its ignorant to wear things brainlessly solely because other people are wearing them.

posted almost 6 years ago
 
neen_cicero
Style_council
neen_cicero
posts: 44

i think if we are going to talk about fashion taken from a culture then we need to look at a larger picture and all cultures… fashion is made out of what people wear and people are naturally influenced by what they see and are exposed too and i understand that… my purpose in pointing this out is just to get people to think about double standards… no one wants there culture to be exploited and i understand that… i think if anyone is offend over this trend then i would ask you to consider all trends… like tribal prints… moccasins (which are all over this web site), and native American inspired clothing which seem to be very popular in the recent past to the present… as well as consider being offended of girls take on what i like to call ” sexy Indian/ Pocahontas Halloween costumes”... is this not perverting some native American cultures traditions… after all headdresses are actually for sacred ceremonies and not for sexy costumes… funny how we have different standards depending on the culture… and funny how some Americans are freaking out over the scarf trend in particular… talk about double standards… I’m only focusing on the native American trend because i am native American and i can speak personally on how my culture has been generalized and exploited in fashion… Ive learned to look the other way though because what else can you do? plus i myself have been influenced by other cultures and their attire… but I’m just curious.. in your opinions where do we draw the line… why is it considered okay in American culture at least to dress up as a “Indian” on Halloween or wear native jewelry or moccasins but not okay and is consider ignorant to wear that scarf mentioned.. I’m pretty sure the people in the Indian costumes don’t know the ceremonies nor the meanings behind their attire on hallween, though no one ever mentions this and im sure its not going to show up on the news…

posted almost 6 years ago
 
ecrivette
Style_council
ecrivette
posts: 7

I have a keffiyeh that my mom got in the Middle East in the 70’s. I started wearing it when 15 or so years ago before the mass terrorist hype. At the time, I did have issues about wearing was I percieved as a male item due to not wanting to offend anyone from the culture from where it came, but I found that no one anywhere seemed to mind and more often than not I received a positive response.
I think it’s unfortunate that an item of clothing is associated with terrorism when there are people in all cultures who do things that are not positive. Military jackets are always coming in and of out style and the represent, well, the military that kills people. I think when it comes to fashion we should all take it with a grain of salt and still try to be respectful for the culture from where it came, and take time to actually learn where something is from and the history behind it. That’s asking a lot, I know. lol…
For me, I’m not tired of this trend at all. I think it’s nice to have ethnic trends incorporated in everyday American style.

posted almost 6 years ago
 
flashesofher
Style_council
flashesofher
posts: 8

army print/camo is worn by a huge majority of civilian americans as well as highly popularized in fashion (mainstream AND high fashion)
i don’t see how this is different from the keffiyeh
the keffiyeh is arguably problematic in the fact that it is a cultural appropriation. (much like septum piercings, dreadlocks, and bamboo hoops)

posted almost 6 years ago
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