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freshlook
New_user freshlook is new to Chictopia!

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freshlook
posts: 35

I want to get into fashion photography—particularly street style photography. What are the best Canon lenses for shooting fashion photos? I’d like to hear some good reviews before making a huge investment.

Thanks!!

posted over 3 years ago
CallysCloset
New_user CallysCloset is new to Chictopia!

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CallysCloset
posts: 10

Yes ppl me too!! Please share!

posted over 3 years ago
 
pandaphilia
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pandaphilia
posts: 1769

i think prime lens with f stop of 1.8 or below are good. for fashion shoots i’ve heard 85 mm and 135 mm are good

posted over 3 years ago
 
playingwithfire
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playingwithfire
posts: 29

This definitely a good lens to try http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup/ef_85mm_f_1_2l_ii_usm

If you need something a little cheaper
http://www.the-digital-picture.com/reviews/canon-ef-50mm-f-1.4-usm-lens-review.aspx

posted over 3 years ago
 
miyukisarah
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miyukisarah
posts: 79

My 50mm f1.4 is my favorite for my fashion/portrait photography. My 70-200mm is also really great though. It means you have to be farther from your model, but you’ll still get some sick shots. I’ve heard from professionals that the long distance zooms are usually best.

posted over 3 years ago
 
carizzachua
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carizzachua
posts: 1750

yes 50mm f1.4 is good for portraits. face/half body shots.

posted about 3 years ago
 
SFStreetStyle
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SFStreetStyle
posts: 5

I love the 50mm lens (with an f.stop of anything 1.8 or below), it’s probably my favorite lens outside of the studio. In studio I definitely favor the 85mm for the sharpness, keep in mind it gets you super close to the subject, so the 85mm probably isn’t the smartest to use outside, when you’ll have to be standing feeeeet away from the subject to capture a photo.

posted about 3 years ago
 
accordingtomlou
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accordingtomlou
posts: 1

i have a 50mm lens that i love. definitely my favorite to use for fashion related photography. and always use a low f.stop!

posted about 3 years ago
 
channierie
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channierie
posts: 151

I have a Canon 550D with standard lens (18mm-50mm). I don’t know how it use it very well yet, but I think I should study it’s settings in the hopes of capturing better photos.

posted almost 3 years ago
 
tightsandtea
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tightsandtea
posts: 1063

I think that completely depends on what sort of photos you’re intent on taking, plus it’s always good to have variety. in general a lower f-stop means a wider aperture, which basically means more light comes in—therefore can have a faster shutter speed, which = sharper photos and better functioning in low-light situations. plus, you can get that bokeh effect, which is probably what you want. that being said, lenses with lower f-stops are much more expensive than their counterparts. the 50mm 1.5 lens is about $400, and the 50mm 1.8 is about $100.

in general, you should definitely have at least one fixed-focus lens and a telephoto lens, along with your standard kit lens. I doubt you’ll need to shoot anything less than 18mm, so you probably won’t need a wide angle lens. if you can’t afford the 85mm fixed focus lens, go for the 50mm 1.8 lens—it’s better for close-up shots, like portraits rather than something full-body. the telephoto lens will come in handy if your subjects are further away. I doubt there’s anything wrong with the kit lens (other than less bokeh/less sharp images), since I’m sure you’ll be shooting within 18-55mm. if you’re rolling around in money and can afford it, go for the 24-105mm lens.

ALSO, if you see a photo that you absolutely love, see if it still has its exif data embedded. paste the image URL onto an exif viewer like this one and you might be able to see what camera the photo was shot from, the lens, the distance, the conditions, etc. for example, let’s say you like this photo. you’d paste the URL into an exif viewer and get this. you can see they didn’t use flash, they shot from 105mm, the aperture was 4.5, they used a mark II, etc. hope that helps, and gl with the photos!

posted almost 3 years ago
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