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thefieldsofelysium
Shop_seller_2 thefieldsofelysium is a Chictopia seller who has been hand-picked by our editors to sell merchandise on our website.

Chictopia sellers carry fashion forward products and ensure great customer experience. Click here if you are interested in selling your merchandise on Chictopia.
thefieldsofe...
posts: 170

i find that a lot of people don’t regard clothing as a terribly significant presence or concern in their lives, but my wardrobe is something i invest a lot of time, money, and attention into (perhaps almost to a disturbing level). i tried to figure out why this is and couldn’t really come up with anything more concrete than the fact that i view my clothes/outfits as an expression. not so much as a pure expression of who i am, but rather a functional exaggeration of a facet of my personality. i operate very much on the visual level, and so – perhaps involuntarily? – i think of others perceiving who i am by what i wear (the same way i perceive who others are by what they wear). and so i dress according to this mindset, even though i’m aware that the degree to which i think others actually take a good look at what i’m wearing is probably far from what it is in reality.
most of the time, i’m rather reserved and don’t really care to integrate myself among strangers (usually peers in new classes), so my use of a monochromatic, severe scheme of clothing usually heightens an air of aloofness, although i’m not actually as aloof as i appear to be. (the adjective changes, depending on what setting i’m in and what i’m wearing that day: “elegant”, “badass”, etc. in any case, i’m never truly or fully what i want others to perceive me as.) in this way, i suppose, the way i dress could act as a sort of screen, as well. (as in, i prevent myself from showing “the real me”, so to speak.) if that’s true, then there’s actually a gap in the translation (of clothing as a part of me) that is impossible to close. maybe that gap is universal, regardless of who you are and what your taste in clothing is.
in addition, having a scheme also forms a signature, in a way, by which i’m instantly identifiable. it’s strange to think of commodities (temporary, disposable) as grounding one’s identity, and sometimes i stand back and think that this shouldn’t be how i assert who i am, that individualism shouldn’t have a material basis. but then i’m again re-absorbed into consumerism, reverting back to fetishizing over new shoes, clothes, etc. (the internet is incredibly unhealthy for me, in this matter).
anyone else find him/herself caught in this endless cycle of reflection/absorption?

posted almost 7 years ago
HelenZ
Style_council
HelenZ
posts: 268

there is nothing bad about consumerism. it helps the economy, creates jobs for others out there, and funds creativity!

posted almost 7 years ago
 
thefieldsofelysium
Shop_seller_2 thefieldsofelysium is a Chictopia seller who has been hand-picked by our editors to sell merchandise on our website.

Chictopia sellers carry fashion forward products and ensure great customer experience. Click here if you are interested in selling your merchandise on Chictopia.
thefieldsofe...
posts: 170

oh, i’m not saying consumerism itself is bad (well, in excess, it could be…). i’m just unsettled on the issue of using commodities as a way of defining oneself. i mean, by allowing objects – which, in and of themselves, have no value (until we assign or give it to them) or identity – to constitute a part of who i am as a person…the concept is disjointed. and yet, i am still caught up (or, rather, actively engaged) in this process without fully understanding why. this is where the tension lies, for me.

posted almost 7 years ago
 
KellyJoy
Style_council
KellyJoy
posts: 38

i don’t see a problem with commodities defining who you are, in part, of course. we need these commodities to express creativity, although there needs to be balance in all things. if one becomes focused to the point of obsession with these things, then a problem arises and adjustment in thinking is necessary. just have fun with styling yourself. you sound so stressed out.

posted almost 7 years ago
 
chocofusion
Style_council
chocofusion
posts: 34

i dress to make myself look presentable to others as a way of showing respect to others and i do feel that others need to care about public appearance as a way of showing respect to those around them.
since i can’t afford to go online and get new stuff all the time, i tend to buy things that absolutely look good on me. cuz sometimez i tend to buy things like that i’ll never wear when i get home cuz they look ridiculous. so for me clothing is a way of expressing myself, but it is also to show that i care about how i present myself. cuz sometimez i do wonder about why that person on the bus is wearing soemthing htat is definitely unflattering on he/she.

posted almost 7 years ago
 
frenchieee
Style_council
frenchieee
posts: 315

What you wear can be a facade as to who you are. I’m sure that everyone that sees me, that doesn’t already know me of course, thinks that I’m “intimidating” or “stuck up” because of what I wear (i.e. all black, heels). In actuality I find myself fairly outspoken/outgoing. My bf told me the first time he saw me looking at ACT/SAT prep books he wanted to know me because I looked “mysterious”. On the other hand, I remember my freshman year I wore all these bright colors, had my hair long and flowy and my ex told me that I looked really down to earth and bubbly. So of course the way you present yourself will give a first impression, but it shouldn’t alter the way you want to dress or rather, what flatters you. The way you dress could symbolize something about you, just not everything. People should take time to get to know you instead.

posted almost 7 years ago
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