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penelope204
Style_council
penelope204
posts: 264

I want to go to FIT but my mom says it’s too expensive. She says it’s best to go to a community college for 2 years and then to transfer but the thing is what does community college has to do with a fashion college? Are the academic classes the same for a community college and fashion college? Do I even need academic classes for a fashion career? Help needed! Thanks

posted almost 3 years ago
Fashion27
Style_council
Fashion27
posts: 118

have you tried applying for financial aid? For fashion school i think it would be best to go all four years since you build upon each year. Im applying to fit too! :)

posted almost 3 years ago
 
babygurldali
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babygurldali
posts: 4

Hmmm i recommend H&M

posted almost 3 years ago
 
tightsandtea
Style_council
tightsandtea
posts: 1063

try and see if you can qualify for financial aid, if it’s expensive. I don’t know anything about fashion school, but I feel like the curriculum would be highly specialized to the point where community college wouldn’t be worth the time—plus, you’d be missing those crucial two years.

that being said, there are requirements to obtain a bachelor’s—this varies from state to state I think. otherwise it’d be more like trade school than anything else. you should look at each individual program’s requirements on the website, or contact their office to ask for advice. for example, go here
it says you need one course each in ten different fields, so yeah talk to an advisor and see if it’s at all possible to do that in CC and do the rest in 2-3 years.

posted almost 3 years ago
 
xokeishaxo
Style_council
xokeishaxo
posts: 68

Honestly it depends on what you want to do with your career. Jump over your 2 year and start looking at what 4 year you would go to if FIT is absolutely not an option. Visit some of these schools and set up a course of action and go over transfer options. Many non-fashion universities still have great fashion programs and some allow you to pick between a design course of study and a merchandising course of study. If you want to do a design course of study I don’t think I would suggest going to a 2 year but if you want to do a merchandising track or you want to go into something like journalism or photography a 2 year would possibly work out great.

My retail program is basically a specific business program. I have an associates in business. When I entered my current school I started as a PR major and nothing crossed over. I found out about our retail program and switched over and found out that most of my classes from my associates would count for my retail.

posted almost 3 years ago
 
xokeishaxo
Style_council
xokeishaxo
posts: 68

Oh and as far as needing academic classes for a fashion career, yes and no.

Some people get lucky and get in based on who they know. Some people are lucky enough to have natural pizazz and knowledge that will get them where they want to be.

However you have to keep in mind that there are going to be tons of people you’re going up against that will have formal fashion and retail training. These are people that have done class projects, participated in student organizations, and worked various internships that have hard proof to back up their skills. Like not to be a jerk but if you and I went into an interview for the same job what would make you seem like a more valuable employee than me when I’ve been through fiber training, know the ins and outs of product development, performed philanthropy involving making hats, etc and have a portfolio to show these things? I’m just saying it would prob be harder. And if you want to work for larger companies a lot of positions do require a bachelor’s degree, sometimes higher.

Plus I’ve come to realize part of what you’re paying for is the ability to make industry contacts through your professors and instructors and the opportunities for one on one guidance as far as your career path.

posted almost 3 years ago
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